A Dentist’s Blueprint to Success: Location is Where It’s At

A Dentist’s Blueprint to Success: Location is Where It’s At

“Location location location” may be an overused phrase, but sometimes that’s what your success is really all about. Steve Anderson’s A Dentist’s Blueprint to Success: The Step-by-Step Process to Owning Your Own Dental Office and Making Your Dream a Reality! guides you in many ways as you set up your dental practice, but one thing the book really stresses is where you establish yourself. And this isn’t just about the street address either; a good location is based on everything from what types of services you offer and what types of clients you expect to how much sun you get through the windows. Only by considering all related factors can you be sure you’ve set up your dental office in the best location possible, for the best work atmosphere and greatest revenue.

In A Dentist’s Blueprint to Success, this question starts with how many operatories you hope to have; this gives you a general idea of square footage. For example, if you have three operatories, on average you will need about 900–1300 square feet; if you have eight, you’ll need somewhere around 2700–3000 square feet. The types of services offered will also determine how big the rooms are, because you’ll need space for the equipment and a good work flow.

But once you’ve got a size range, you can rule out places that are too small or too big. If you’re going to rent, you’ll first want to learn what your potential landlord is like, not to mention whether the building can handle a dental office’s utility needs. It may seem simpler just to build your own office, but that brings other types of questions. Can you find an empty lot that’s the right size? Is the chosen area zoned for your type of business? If it’s in an area that hasn’t been built up yet, will the utilities be adequate? How far away are emergency services? And will your office be accessible by transit or car? Whether you rent or own, parking is always an issue.

The office atmosphere can also be affected by location. If you are overshadowed by skyscrapers or all your windows gaze at a brick wall, the office may feel pretty gloomy. You might want to invest in window shutters and extra lighting in work areas, while reception may need some lamps to make it warm and inviting. On the other hand, a lot of sun or daylight will really cheer up the office and might even allow the special touch of plants or flowers.

Do all these considerations feel a bit overwhelming? To learn about all these factors and more, click here for your copy of A Dentist’s Blueprint to Success: The Step-by-Step Process to Owning Your Own Dental Office and Making Your Dream a Reality! Remember—your location can affect every other part of your dental business, including your revenue, so buy the book today to understand how!

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